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The flame in the darkness

Original version:
Author(s):
Norwegian artist and writer talks about his friendships with Soviet dissidents.

'The Russian human rights struggle - as I have seen it.'

Translated from the Norwegian by Alwyn and Dermott McKay; Foreword by Vladimir Maximov

When Solzhenitsyn visited Norway within ten days of being expelled from Russia, the man he asked to meet him was the painter Sparre. Later Sparre did much to ensure that the Nobel Peace Prize went to Sakharov. In his foreword, Maximov tells of Sparre visiting Sakharov in Moscow and bringing 'warmth and understanding' at a time when the human rights leaders were under great pressure from the KGB. 'So long as there are people like this in the world,' Maximov goes on, 'those suffering oppression need not feel they are alone.' He tells too of the succession of Russian human rights leaders who visited Sparre in his home in Oslo, for 'friendship and counsel'.

From the insight he gained from all these touches, Sparre gives us a unique picture, both intimate and authentic, of most of the men who led what is known in the West as the dissident movement. Solzhenitsyn, Sakharov, Bukovski, and many others who have been in the headlines move through his pages, drawn with a painter's perceptiveness.

Many of them are believers, most accept the importance of Christianity in their struggle. Sparre feels he understands that struggle the better because he himself is a believer.

Author(s)
Language

English

Original version
Publication
1980
Pages
140
Type
Publisher
Grosvenor Books
ISBN
0 901269 49 2
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'Lågan i mörkret' book cover in Swedish
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Attached media: PDF

Swedish

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